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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
was the first democratic election in south africa five years later. i was there when the country's black majority voted by the millions, waiting in lines that stretched from one horizon to the other. i saw first hand the devotion to democracy. it was the great legacy of the man who died today. president obama paid tribute to nelson mandela today. through his fierce dignity and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others i moved all of us. he embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer power and reconcile those who jailed him set an example for all to aspire to, whether in the lives of nations or in our own personal lives. >>> i promised you the president of the united states. and he's here. let's play "hardball." >> it's my honor to introduce the president of the united states. [ applause ] >> well, thank you, mr. president. >> it's good to see you. >> so what brought you to "hardball"? >> american university. [cheers and applause] >> "hardball" was just an excuse to hang out with these fine, young p
the cat's got their tongue. or is it the calendar. with elections coming next year and those on the right with any iq have noticed the one time the democrats saw their numbers go skyward was when the republicans played stupid party and turned themselves into the anyone couple pops of the potomac and shut done the government. tonight we look at this strange new world, scared to death at the second there's talk of closing it the democrats will open up another big lead in public confidence. who would have believed it would only take a month to teach the tea party that no government is bad politics. david corn for mother jones and howard fineman for "the huffington post" both msnbc political analysts. i know there are still questions about febds. but this week when it looks like they might have a budget deal and january when the continuing resolution comes up for continuing, it looks like they've decided not to go all-out crazy again. is this pure politics or grownup behavior or a mix? >> well, don't count your non-shutdowns before they happen. because there are 20 or so house g g g gop'ers.
much time worrying about the next election and not the generation. the solution to that is ultimately what was envisioned by our founders. and what jack kennedy understood as well. and that's the american people. we go through these periods where our politics gets all bollucks up. the truth is when you look at our history, there's been a lot of times where congress gets stuck. but the reason we get through it is the american people have good instincts. if over and over again they see we're not addressing the core problems we have, eventually they will put in place folks who are serious about getting the work done. >> let's talk about the problem with the legislative branch. the other day speaker boehner said that we can't get anything done because we have a divided country, a divided congress. but that's the nature of america. they have an aisle down the middle of the senate. an aisle down the middle of the house. they've always been there. we've rarely had one party in power for more than a year or two. so we stuck with this as long as we have two parties running our government, they
? >> yeah, and certainly that's always been quite difficult. i would say in the recent election in the governor's race in virginia, you did see turnout that didn't appreciably drop in terms of the percentage of the electorate that was made up by certain segments of that population that you would normally see in a non-presidential election. so i definitely think there is some hope for that and there's certainly some evidence for that. it's clear that that is going to have to happen in order to see change in a government that might well be determined because of redistricting and the real estate of the political environment as much as anything else. >> yeah. david corn, he was very careful to say the people that don't necessarily show up meaning minorities and young people. there he was talking to a young people's crowd to project to a larger number of people using that audience. did you hear -- because the only implication could be. or he still hopes to get a governoring majority in both houses where he's able to get things done. like immigration, like a lot of things in implement
elections you'll know whether this is, indeed, working more or less as obama promised it would and more or less as people want it to work. republicans might find themselves tremendously isolated fighting against something that's working, that's successful. remember, they still have a history of opposing security, medicare, medicaid, and a lot of programs. once they've kicked in and once they've become -- >> let's talk 2016. i don't want to erase the presidency. you've got a debating platform with secretary clinton or anybody else, she'll probably be the nominee, who knows. all you say is what's your plan? you're empty handed. whether you're an attractive candidate like christie or someone like that. i'm sorry, i don't have one. well, that's a problem. >> they don't have a plan. they say the same old thing, free market solutions. this is a free market solution, "a." but "b," we know what they're talking about. they're talking about the same health savings accounts that work fine if you're healthy but don't if you're not healthy. and they don't have an idea. and they're going to get more
couple elections. that's all we have to do. but there might be a smaller break out of republicans who say, you know what? i've got a responsibility to my constituents at home to make this thing better. it's going to be here. it's going to be here as long as we live. it'll be here forever, perhaps. but i'm going to make it better. there's a couple tweaks i know about. maybe i heard it from jack cason or someone i look more positively toward on the republican side. >> you're hearing some people speak in those terms, chris. let's face it. it's still a fact that obama and obama care are the two words that really unify republicans across their factional lines and they're not going to give up on it very quickly. and the minute they come up with a positive suggestion of which there are several floating around paul ryan and others have had a free market oriented alternatives. but they are not popular. even among republicans. they can't build a consensus around them. we debated proposals during the last presidential election, you'll remember. no voucherizing medicare, selling insurance across stat
tactics or that he's an illegal alien who shouldn't have been elected in the first place and should be deported to east africa or somewhere more distant. we have a wild and wooly right wing out there that cares nothing about facts, only the need to strike a blow for benghazi, birtherism or bingo. yesterday the republican led house judiciary committee held a hearing called the president's constitutional duty to faithfully execute the laws. dana milbank is with us right now. this was an impeachment hearing. time and again, the red hots on the far right blew the bugle for driving the president from office. >> what can you do. you got to go up there and you impeach him or you go up there and you just cut funds off. you shut everything down. >> if a president is ignoring entire categories of the law, whether it be immigration, marijuana, mandatory minimum, the aca, what is the remedy for the legislative branch. >> the next recourse, the word that we don't like to say. >> we've also talked about the i word, impeachment, which i don't think would get past the senate in the current climate.
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)